Pushing Back Against the “Hungry China Is Going to Starve The World”

china-rice-1024x710
Chart via Thomson Reuters

Zhang Hongzhou a research fellow at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore pushes back against the “A Hungry China is Going to Starve World and Despoil the Planet” narrative.

However the key to whether the global grain market can meet China’s huge demand is the global food producing capacity. China is feeding over 20 per cent of the world population with only eight per cent of the world’s arable land, and six per cent of the world’s water resources. This means the rest of the world, with over 92 per cent of global arable land and 94 per cent of the world water resources, only produced food for less than 80 per cent of the population. In other words, there is huge potential to increase global food production.

As long as China enters the international food market in a gradual and transparent manner, giving the global agricultural sectors sufficient time to respond, China’s food import will not lead to food price spikes. While moderate increase in global food prices is expected, this will not threaten global food security either; instead, it will be conducive to the revitalisation of global agriculture and poverty alleviation.

In doing so, he touches on the land grab claim that I highlighted the other day in a piece in Slate.

Another major evidence to support the China threat theory is its alleged land grabbing in foreign countries, particularly Africa. Indeed, in 2006, China introduced the “agriculture going-out” strategy and since then China has built production bases for cereal, soybeans, rubber and other agricultural products in Russia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, South America and other areas.

However, the scale of China’s land acquisition in Africa is marginal. On the contrary, agricultural aid and assistance has been the main approach of China’s “agriculture going-out” in Africa. What is more, till now, agricultural produce from China’s overseas agricultural investment is mainly sold on the international market instead of being shipped back to China. This not only makes economic sense but also helps harness the potential of global food production.

Read the whole thing at Yale Global.

Advertisements

Tags: , ,

About Marc Brazeau

Free lance cultural attaché. Writing at REALFOOD.ORG.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: